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Ambien High

Ambien, also known as zolpidem, is a prescription sedative medication used to treat insomnia, a sleep disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. While it can be an effective treatment for sleep problems, it can also be misused recreationally, which can lead to severe consequences.

How Does It Work?

This drug enhances the activity of a neurotransmitter called GABA, which helps reduce the activity of the brain and induce sleep. It is typically prescribed for short-term use, usually no more than a few weeks, to help people fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer. The drug is a sedative-hypnotic, but not a narcotic, and slows down activity in the brain, making it easier for users to fall asleep and stay asleep for seven to eight hours.

Recreational Use

People who use it recreationally often take a far higher than the recommended dose, with some users mixing the sedative drug with other drugs, such as alcohol, marijuana, or prescription opioid painkillers. Recreational users describe the high as trippy or psychedelic, with some reporting a lift in mood but no psychedelic hallucinations. However, getting high, especially consistently, alters the complex physical chemistry in the brain and body, decreasing overall health and well-being.

Misuse

While this medication is primarily intended for use as a sleep aid, some people misuse this medication. This can occur when someone takes more than the prescribed dose or takes it without a prescription. Taking more than prescribed can cause feelings of euphoria, dizziness, and a sense of detachment from reality. Some people report feeling “out of body” experiences or hallucinations when they take high doses.

Potential Dangers

Misuse of it can lead to several serious side effects, including memory loss, extreme drowsiness, addiction, and respiratory problems. Taking too much can cause slowed breathing, which can be life-threatening in some cases. Furthermore, consistently using it to get high is problematic because people develop a tolerance to the medication and use more significant amounts to feel its effects, increasing the risk of overdose.

Questions and Answers

  1. Is Ambien more addictive than Xanax?
    Ambien and Xanax belong to different classes of drugs, with Ambien classified as a sedative-hypnotic and Xanax classified as a benzodiazepine. Both drugs have the potential for addiction, but studies suggest that Xanax may have a higher potential for abuse and dependence compared to Ambien. According to a study published in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, people who take Xanax are more likely to develop a substance use disorder compared to people who take Ambien.
  2. Can Ambien make you do weird things?
    Yes, Ambien has been known to cause people to do things that they don’t remember doing, which is sometimes referred to as “Ambien-induced amnesia.” Some people who take Ambien have reported engaging in activities such as driving, eating, or having sex without being fully awake or aware of their actions. It’s important to take Ambien exactly as prescribed and to talk to your doctor if you experience any unusual behaviors or memory problems while taking the medication.
  3. What happens if you take Ambien every night?
    Taking Ambien every night can lead to dependence and addiction, as well as other potential side effects. Ambien is typically prescribed for short-term use, usually no more than a few weeks, to help people fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer. If taken every night for an extended period, the body can develop a tolerance to the medication, meaning higher doses may be needed to achieve the same effect. Consistently using Ambien to get high is problematic because people develop a tolerance to the medication and use more significant amounts to feel its effects, increasing the risk of overdose.
  4. Is Ambien a hallucinogen?
    No, Ambien is not a hallucinogen. It is a sedative-hypnotic drug that works by enhancing the activity of a neurotransmitter called GABA, which helps reduce the activity of the brain and induce sleep. While some people who take Ambien recreationally report experiencing psychedelic-like effects, such as trippy or colorful visuals, this is not a typical or intended effect of the drug. Ambien is primarily intended for use as a sleep aid, and misuse of the medication can lead to severe consequences, as outlined in the previous answers.

Withdrawal and Addiction

Withdrawing from this medicine is severe and, in some cases, dangerous. People who want to stop taking it should always consult their physician and slowly decrease the dosage over time. Going “cold turkey” can cause many physical and emotional symptoms, such as tremors, vomiting, anxiety, depression, confusion, and cravings for the drug. Treatment for addiction typically involves a combination of behavioral therapies, medication management, and support groups.

Conclusion

While it is an effective medication for treating insomnia, misusing it to get high can have severe consequences. Misuse can lead to addiction, memory loss, respiratory problems, and other dangerous side effects. According to a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Ambien-related emergency room visits increased by 220 percent in five years, between 2005 and 2010. If you or someone you know is struggling with abuse or addiction, seek help from a medical professional to start the journey towards recovery.

  • “FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA approves new label changes and dosing for zolpidem products and a recommendation to avoid driving the day after using Ambien CR” by FDA, updated 2013, accessed 2023
  • “Zolpidem (Oral Route)” by Mayo Clinic, updated 2021, accessed 2023
  • “Ambien Abuse and Addiction” by American Addiction Centers, updated 2021, accessed 2023
  • “Ambien Overdose” by Addiction Group, updated 2021, accessed 2023
  • “Ambien: Uses, Side Effects, and Addiction Risks” by Healthline, updated 2022, accessed 2023
  • “Ambien-Related Emergency Department Visits by Adults Aged 45 and Over: United States, 2005–2010” by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), published 2013, accessed 2023

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