Ultracet - Niche Pain Reliever - Opioid, Antidepressant Plus a Booster ☆☆☆☆☆ 0
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Ultracet – Niche Pain Reliever – Opioid, Antidepressant Plus a Booster

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Ultracet is a pain relief medication containing acetaminophen (Tylenol) and Tramadol hydrochloride (Ultram). It provides effects similar to those of other opioid analgesics. In 2001, it was approved by the FDA for acute pain relief.

  • It is a powerful combination of Tramadol & Tylenol.
  • A narcotic pain relief medication containing acetaminophen and tramadol, this prescription drug provides effects similar to those of a pure opioid analgesic such as OxyContin or Darvon.
  • Acetaminophen seems to increase (potentiate) the sedative and analgesic effects of tramadol.
  • It is specifically meant for five-day use only due to its addictive properties.

Doctors prescribe this drug for acute pain that has not responded to other prescription pain medications.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency lists it as a Schedule IV drug. So, it is considered to have low abuse potential. However, the DEA goes on to report  tramadol is a commonly abused narcotic in the U.S.

  • The National Survey on Drug Use and Health found nearly two million U.S. citizens took drugs containing tramadol in the past year.

Other brand names for products containing Tramadol include;

  • Conzip
  • Ryzolt
  • Ultram
  • Rybix ODT

Two Drug Combo

This drug is a combination of 37.5 mg of Tramadol and 325 mg of acetaminophen.

  • The tablets are light yellow, coated, capsule-shaped, and engraved with “O-M” on one side and “650” on the other.

Doctors prescribe it for acute pain that has not responded to other prescription pain medications.

  • Tramadol is a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic.
  • It is an opioid pain medicine (narcotic).
  • This drug is not approved for use for more than 5 days.
  • Tramadol is the generic brand name for Ultram.
  • National Drug Code (NDC) #50458-650

History

Developed in 1962 in Germany by a pharmaceutical company specializing in pain relief, tramadol remained in Germany for 15 years while it underwent numerous tests before being approved and sold in foreign markets.

  • Tramadol did not become available to U.S. physicians until 1995.
  • Acetaminophen (paracetamol) went on sale in the U.S. in 1955 as “Tylenol”.

SNRI Antidepressant Type

Tramadol is considered to be a serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). It acts by binding to the μ-opioid receptor of the neuron.

According to the NIH “Dual action antidepressants mirtazapine (Remeron), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and most notably venlafaxine (Effexor), which tramadol is closely related to in structure, also inhibit NE and 5HT reuptake. These medications are proven effective antidepressants and this shared monoaminergic action resulted in the research of tramadol as a potential treatment for depression.”

Potential Risks

Tramadol is an opioid analgesic that targets the central nervous system to alleviate severe pain.

  • When taken for an extended period, it may become physically and psychologically habit-forming.
  • Physical dependence on tramadol is more pronounced than mental dependence, which can cause withdrawal symptoms similar to those suffered by heroin users.
  • While acetaminophen is technically listed as not addicting, it may damage your liver when taken in larger than normal doses daily.
  • This is why people addicted to Ultracet may be diagnosed with liver disease if they are long-term abusers of Ultracet.

Side Effects

Some people react negatively to even normal dosages. Reports of irritability, agitation, extreme anxiety and even suicidal thoughts have been documented by physicians prescribing it. While acetaminophen is not addicting, it may damage your liver when taken in larger than normal doses daily. This is why people addicted to Ultracet may be diagnosed with liver disease if they are long-term abusers. Side effects can include:

  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness/sedation
  • Overall “numb” feeling/pain relief
  • Difficulty speaking or controlling body movements
  • Euphoria

Risk of seizures is higher in people taking this drug who are addicted to other drugs or alcohol, have a metabolic disorder or recently suffered a head injury.

Dosage

The usual prescribed dose is two tablets taken every four to six hours (max of eight per day for five days). The  maximum dose is generally considered to be 8 tablets per day.

You should not drink alcohol or take other drugs containing opioids or acetaminophen while taking it. It could cause life-threatening side effects or overdose.

Addiction Risk

Research shows that people without a history of drug or alcohol abuse could become addicted. If you suddenly stop taking it after five days at the recommended dose, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as:

  • Flu-like symptoms (nausea, fever, severe headache, joint pain)
  • Panic/anxiety
  • Paranoia
  • Insomnia
  • Dehydration

Gradually reducing dosage is highly recommended for people being weaned off of this opioid pain reliever. Withdrawal symptoms typically begin within 12 to 24 hours after taking a last dose. For reasons not yet known by scientists, withdrawing from drugs containing tramadol seems to take longer than withdrawing from other opioids.

It is also converted in the liver to desmetramadol, an opioid with stronger binding to the μ-opioid receptor.

  • Do not stop using this drug abruptly.

Alcohol

Tramadol increases the effects of alcohol and may cause someone to forget how many pills they have taken. Like other prescription opioid pain relievers mixed with alcohol, it presents a real risk for overdose, coma and death. Naloxone is sometimes used to counteract an overdose but it does not address all symptoms of an overdose

 

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