About Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) High – Cyclobenzaprine & Alcohol

Today we’re talking about the experience and effects of a Flexeril Cyclobenzaprine high. Cyclobenzaprine (aka Flexeril), is a potent muscle relaxer prescribed to alleviate painful musculoskeletal conditions and ease muscle spasms. Chemically associated with a drug family called tricyclic antidepressants, cyclobenzaprine emerged as one of the first depression medications in the 1950s. Similar to the way tricyclics treat depression, cyclobenzaprine prevents reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin so that the brain is exposed to increased levels of these two mood transmitters. In addition, researchers think cyclobenzaprine blocks nerve impulses traveling to the brain to provide pain relief.

Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) 10 mg High

For musculoskeletal pain and spasms, doctors typically prescribe 10 mg of cyclobenzaprine two or three times daily. For severe pain, dosage can be increased to 60 mg daily. However, prescriptions are written as a two week supply only because of Flexeril’s potential for abuse and addiction. For new cyclobenzaprine users, a cyclobenzaprine 10 mg high is possible until they develop a tolerance for the drug’s sedating effects.

Is Cyclobenzaprine Classified as a Narcotic?

No, cyclobenzaprine is not a narcotic. It is classified as a tricyclic amine salt that does not target opioid receptors in the brain. A narcotic is defined as a psychoactive drug associated with opioids and opiates that induces sleep and is a derivative of raw opium compounds.

Cyclobenzaprine High – Dangers of Recreational Use – Abuse

By interfering with normal neurotransmitter levels in the brain, Flexeril and other medications containing cyclobenzaprine may cause abusers to suffer anticholinergic toxidromeor prevention of cholinergic neurotransmission to specific receptors in the brain. Symptoms of anticholinergic toxidrome caused by cyclobenzaprine abuse include:

  • Confusion, delirium and/or altered mental status
  • Paranoia
  • Fever, flushing
  • Abnormal pupil dilation
  • Inability to urinate
  • Hypertension
  • Tachycardia

Unless treated, severe anticholinergic toxidrome may lead to coma, seizures and heart attack.

Although rare, Flexeril users can have life-threatening allergic reactions to cyclobenzaprine. Indications of an allergic reaction involve swelling of the lips, throat and tongue, difficulty breathing and hives. Anaphylaxis is a real possibility for those experiencing an allergic reaction to Flexeril.

Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) High and Alcohol

Combining cyclobenzaprine with alcohol or other central nervous depressant will enhance the sedative effects of cyclobenzaprine. Brain functioning becomes severely impaired, breathing may slow significantly and heart rate can drop to shock levels.

If enough cyclobenzaprine and alcohol are taken simultaneously, the user risks complete suppression of the respiratory system and/or heart failure.

Flexeril also increases depressant qualities of other drugs such as antihistamines, antidepressants, narcotic pain medications and other muscle relaxants. Taking cyclobenzaprine with MOA inhibitors (Marplan, Nardil, Parnate) may cause death. If you are taking an MAO, doctors will make you stop taking the MAO at least two weeks before you begin using a cyclobenzaprine product.

Is Cyclobenzaprine Addictive?

Image of pills and pill bottlesThe U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency does not classify cyclobenzaprine as a drug presenting potential addiction risks. However, some people discovering the sedative, muscle relaxing effects of Flexeril may start abusing it for its psychoactive properties and develop high tolerance levels. Additionally, cyclobenzaprine does cause unpleasant side effects and withdrawal symptoms if someone addicted to Flexeril abruptly stops taking it.
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About the author

Robert M. has been in recovery since 1988. He is a sponsor and loyal member of AA. He has been working in the drug and alcohol field for nearly 20 years. During that time, he has written industry blogs and articles for a variety of industry websites including Transitions, Malibu Horizons, Behavioral Health of the Palm Beaches and Lifeskills of Boca Raton.

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